Tag Archives: lockdown

New Zealand to end coronavirus lockdown

New Zealand to end coronavirus lockdownNew Zealand will phase out its coronavirus lockdown over the next 10 days after successfully containing the virus, although some restrictions will remain, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced Monday. Ardern said that from Thursday shopping malls, restaurants, cinemas and playgrounds will reopen — with the country moving to Level Two on its four-tier system. The 39-year-old leader warned “none of us can assume COVID is not with us” but said New Zealand currently had only 90 active cases after a seven-week lockdown.



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Killing of rare river dolphins sparks poaching fears in Bangladesh lockdown

Killing of rare river dolphins sparks poaching fears in Bangladesh lockdownThe gutted carcass of a freshwater dolphin has been found in a river sanctuary in Bangladesh, officials said Sunday, sparking fears fishermen are taking advantage of the virus lockdown to poach the endangered creatures. Locals in the southeastern town of Raojan found the remains of the 62-inch (157-centimetre) long Ganges river dolphin on the banks of the Halda River, fishery department official Abdullah al Mamun told AFP. The dolphin is the second to be found dead in the same sanctuary since Bangladesh imposed its lockdown to tackle the coronavirus, said Manzoorul Kibria, coordinator of the Halda River Research Laboratory (HRRL).



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Germany's infection rate rises above one after lockdown eased

Germany's infection rate rises above one after lockdown easedGermany’s coronavirus reproduction rate – the crucial measure shows how widely the virus is spreading in the community – has risen to 1.1, giving rise to fears that a second wave of infections may be imminent. The findings come just days after the country begun the first phase of relaxing its coronavirus lockdown measures, while anti-lockdown protests have been building across the country. Germany has been lauded internationally for its coordinated response to the virus and its corresponding low death rate, with 7,549 having fallen victim to the disease there until Saturday, compared with 31,587 in the UK, which has a much smaller population. But the rise in infections suggests that the lockdown relaxations may have been premature, and is a headache for Chancellor Angela Merkel who has limits on her powers in Germany's decentralised system. Britain will be watching the developments closely as it begins to move towards easing lockdown. When she announced a relaxation of lockdown measures on Wednesday, Germany’s reproduction rate was at 0.65, before rising to 0.81 on Friday and 1.1 on Saturday. A rate of 1 or more means that each carrier of the virus infects at least one more person, ensuring it continues to spread. Germany’s Robert Koch Institute which compiled the figures, said it that while the rate has been increasing rapidly since Wednesday, at this stage it cannot be determined whether the relaxed lockdowns were responsible. It said: “The increase in the estimated (reproduction) value makes it necessary to watch the development very carefully over the next few days.|" The findings come from data compiled on Saturday, and show that the infection rate has now effectively doubled in the three days since the relaxation of lockdown restrictions. On Saturday, outbreaks at several meatpacking plants in North Rhine-Westphalia – the country’s most populous state – prompted the state leadership to promise to test each of the estimated 18-20,000 meatworkers in the state. In the western town of Coesfeld, where 151 of 200 slaughterhouse workers tested positive for the virus, authorities decided to suspend lockdown relaxations. Despite the outbreaks, Armin Laschet, Prime Minister of North Rhine-Westphalia, called for the country’s border with France to be reopened in order to foster European solidarity. Merkel struck a different tone when announcing the first phase of relaxations midweek, reminding the German public “we still have a long fight against the virus ahead of us”. It was a rare example of contradicting sentiments between the German leader and the man favoured to succeed her as leader of the Christian Democrats when she steps down next year. Despite the continued danger posed by Covid-19, protesters took to the streets across Germany at the weekend to criticise the lockdown measures. Thousands gathered in Berlin, Frankfurt, Stuttgart and other German cities, saying their rights were being infringed and complaining that the government and medical workers were spreading panic. In Munich, more than 3,000 people – many without masks and not respecting social distancing rules – gathered in the city’s central Marienplatz, with signs critical of “health fascism” and proclaiming: “We want our lives back”. Although there have been consistent protests against the measures since they were first put in place in March, the weekend’s demonstrations were the biggest seen so far since the outbreak of the virus. The German Press Agency reports that although the group was well over the maximum of 50 people allowed to attend demonstrations under the government’s coronavirus restrictions, police decided not to break up the largely peaceful demonstration in the interests of “proportionality”. Munich Mayor Dieter Reiter was heavily critical of the protesters on Sunday. Despite saying he empathised with their desire “to return to a certain normality”, Reiter told German media "I have absolutely no understanding of actions or demonstrations that, due to the lack of distance and mouth / nose protection, counteract any positive developments in the infection and more likely to jeopardise further loosening than to enable it." Reiter also said he found it “absolutely unbearable” that the protests had a heavy presence from known far-right groups.



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Russia's Putin orders gradual easing of coronavirus lockdown despite surge in cases

Russia's Putin orders gradual easing of coronavirus lockdown despite surge in casesRussian President Vladimir Putin on Monday announced a gradual easing of coronavirus lockdown measures despite a new surge in infections which took Russia’s tally past Italy’s, making it the fourth highest in the world. Putin, in a televised nationwide address, said that from Tuesday he would start lifting restrictions that had forced many people to work from home and businesses to temporarily close. The Russian leader emphasised the lifting of restrictions would be gradual and that individual regions in the world’s largest country would need to tailor their approach to varying local conditions.



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Coronavirus spreads among Indian police enforcing world's largest lockdown

Coronavirus spreads among Indian police enforcing world's largest lockdownHundreds of Indian police have tested positive for the coronavirus in recent days, raising alarm among an over-stretched force as it attempts to enforce the world’s largest lockdown to contain the pandemic. TV footage early in the crisis showed police beating back migrant workers as they tried to board city buses to reach their villages, making a mockery of social distancing. India has been under lockdown since March 25 and confirmed nearly 50,000 coronavirus cases and some 1,694 deaths.



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German lockdown 'snitches' spark hot debate

German lockdown 'snitches' spark hot debateOn a sunny Sunday in April, 20 people were enjoying a barbecue in the city of Schwerin in northern Germany. The police promptly intervened, slapping them with a fine for breaking new social distancing rules to limit the spread of COVID-19. Telling on your neighbours is a highly sensitive subject in a country still haunted by memories of Nazism and the former communist dictatorship in East Germany, two regimes under which informing on others was practically a national policy.



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Colombian capital's mayor under fire for lockdown breach

Colombian capital's mayor under fire for lockdown breachProsecutors in Colombia are investigating Bogota mayor Claudia Lopez for allegedly breaching the country’s strict quarantine rules against the spread of the coronavirus. The state prosecutor’s office said it was investigating Lopez after a video circulated on social media at the weekend showing the mayor shopping at a supermarket with her wife, a senator. The leftist mayor is married to member of the country’s senate, Angelica Lozano.



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Anti-Vaxxers and Lockdown Protesters Form an Unholy Alliance

Anti-Vaxxers and Lockdown Protesters Form an Unholy AllianceProtests against social distancing and stay-at-home guidelines in states across the country have become fertile ground for anti-vaccine activists, foreshadowing future showdowns over government-led efforts to help bring an end to the coronavirus pandemic.Del Bigtree, a notorious anti-vaccination activist before the emergence of COVID-19, attended a reopening rally in Austin last weekend to find out why the protesters were showing up. Bigtree told The Daily Beast that he saw a lot of overlap between anti-vaccine activists who distrust vaccines and the rally-goers, who were complaining that the public health policies put in place by state governments are unconstitutional and draconian relative to the health crisis at hand.“I think the science is falling apart,” Bigtree said, citing models he called “a disaster.” On April 17, Bigtree featured Wendy Darling, founder of anti-stay-at-home-order group “Michigan United for Liberty” and an attendee of one of the Michigan protests, on his online show The High Wire, which usually dedicates programming to questioning health professionals and settled science. Asked by Bigtree whether the demonstrations showed that at least some Michiganders “are not afraid of dying from the coronavirus,” Darling said: “In our group, in particular, we've got thousands of people in Michigan United for Liberty and the consensus there is, you know, we are not. We're more afraid of the government than we are of the virus at this point.” Trump Calls Rule-Breaking Coronavirus Protesters ‘Very Responsible People’Bigtree isn’t the only drawing connections between the anti-vaccine movement—which advocates for the fallacious notion that vaccines cause autism or other ailments—and the movements against the stay-at-home orders. Anti-vaccine activists have pushed a hashtag calling for President Donald Trump to fire the government’s top infectious disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci—a message that evolved into a “Fire Fauci” chant at the Texas rally Bigtree attended. Some participants in the reopening rallies have also adopted “I Do Not Consent” as their go-to sign formulation, which is the same language that’s become a popular phrase for anti-vaccination activists. “That’s one of their biggest slogans,” said Amy Pisani, the executive director of pro-vaccine group Vaccinate Your Family. The predominantly right-wing activists calling for states to reopen businesses amid the pandemic have also criticized vaccines in their online communities. On “Michiganders Against Excessive Quarantine,” a Facebook group with more than 350,000 members that has become a hotbed for anti-social distancing protests in the state, thousands of members said they wouldn’t take any future vaccine. Some posters pushed conspiracy theories that the vaccine would be the “mark of the Beast” or a tracking device used by billionaire Bill Gates. A user in “Reopen Missouri,” another Facebook group devoted to rapidly reopening businesses, made a popular post that included a vow to never take any future coronavirus vaccine.  “I refuse to receive said vaccine to make others feel more safe,” it read. “I won’t set myself—or my children—on fire to keep you warm.”Facebook Axed Pro-Vaccine Ads, Let Anti-Vaxxer Conspiracies Slip ThroughThe possibility of anti-vaccine advocates gaining a foothold in the protests against public safety laws could portend even dicier problems for government agencies ahead. Health officials have said that a vaccine for coronavirus is one of, if not the, surest ways to emerge through the crisis and return to a semblance of social normalcy. But that depends on wide-scale cultural acceptance of the vaccination—which optimistically could be 18 months away from production—and the coronavirus pandemic has drawn more online interest to anti-vaccine causes. Jackie Schlegal, the founder of well-funded anti-vaccine group Texans for Vaccine Choice, claims that her group has received an “overwhelming influx of support” and a load of traffic from people concerned about coronavirus vaccine exemptions. The anti-vaccine language used by the reopening activists marks the latest confluence between anti-vaccine activists and anti-government groups, who have teamed up in the past to fight vaccine mandates, according to Pisani. “It’s not new that these libertarians and ultra-anti-government individuals have been working together with anti-vaccine activists in recent years,” she said. Much of the rhetoric at the reopening rallies mirrors the language of anti-vaccine activists, according to Professor Jennifer Reich, a University of Colorado Denver sociologist who has studied why parents don’t vaccinate their children. According to Reich’s research, the rise in non-vaccinations among children has come as a result of two trends: pressure on parents to research every detail of the choices available to their children; and the idea that individuals, not public health experts or doctors, are best positioned to handle their own health decisions. “We’ve perfectly set the stage for parents not to trust vaccines,” Reich said.  Now those same trends are coming into focus during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to Reich. Just as anti-vaccine parents claim they can best handle the decision to vaccinate their children, anti-social distancing protesters have vowed to judge the risks of walking around in public, not wearing masks, or not taking any vaccine themselves. “A lot of their rhetoric is really about individual self management, and that they want to be in control of mitigating their own risk,” Reich said of the rally goers. Reich fears that the demands for public health officials to move expeditiously in finding a solution to coronavirus could only feed skepticism of vaccines, as the skeptics will point to shortened clinical trials to cast doubt about its safety or efficacy. Already anti-vaccine activists like Bigtree are questioning the coronavirus vaccine process. “It’s going to affirm the worst fears of those who already distrust the vaccine system,” Reich said. For Pisani, the head of the pro-vaccine group, the coronavirus pandemic represents a crucial point for the ongoing fight pitting pro-vaccine forces and health experts against anti-vaccine groups. The pandemic could ramp up skepticism about government health advice, giving anti-vaccine activists a broader platform. But at the same time, the general public has never been so interested in vaccines and virology in recent memory, or more desperate for a vaccine. “I just can’t understand if they had an elderly family member and there was a vaccine — they wouldn’t want to give the vaccine to that person?” Pisani said. “It’s unbelievable.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



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Italy to Relax Lockdown in Key Step for Europe’s Virus Fight

Italy to Relax Lockdown in Key Step for Europe’s Virus Fight(Bloomberg) — Italy will present a plan this week to ease its rigid lockdown, joining Germany, France and Austria in pursuing a gradual return to normality as coronavirus infection rates fall and pressure mounts to reopen businesses.Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte aims to roll out a detailed restart program beginning on May 4, saying in a post on Facebook that the process will take time in order to mitigate risks of re-igniting the spread of the disease. On Tuesday, the nation reported an almost equal number of virus recoveries and infections for the first time.“Now, we must loosen restrictions,” Conte later told lawmakers in Italy’s Senate. “We must do everything possible to preserve the industrial sector. The country’s engines must restart.”Italy’s commitment to relax containment measures is an important marker in Europe’s battle with the pandemic. The original center of the continent’s outbreak suffered the most deaths after the U.S. and has the third-most cases in the world.With more than 100,000 fatalities in the region, Europe’s leaders are seeking to strike a balance between saving lives and securing jobs. The first steps to loosen curbs in Austria, Denmark and Norway are putting pressure on others to follow suit, despite the lack of treatments or a cure.Italy recorded 2,729 new cases of the disease, compared with 2,256 a day earlier, the first increase in five days, according to the civil protection agency on Tuesday. Against that, the number of recovered patients hit 2,723 over the past 24 hours, a daily record.Italy’s current restrictions — in force since mid-March — shutter all non-essential businesses, ban movements within the country, and all but confine people to their homes except for buying food, going to work and seeking medical help.Conte is juggling caution from scientific and public-health advisers, who insist the decline in new cases is still slow and relaxed restrictions could trigger a new outbreak, with demands from businesses and regional governors to restart the economy.Similar pressures are playing out in capitals across Europe, and leaders are pleading for patience.Because of contagion risks, Munich canceled its famed Oktoberfest for the first time since World War II, and Spain won’t hold the traditional running-of-the-bulls festival in Pamplona in July, the latest signs that disruptions will linger for months to come.“We agreed that the risk is simply too great” to hold the traditional beer and folk festival in Munich, Bavarian Premier Markus Soeder said. “We are living in different times, and living with corona means living carefully.” The move deals a $ 1.3 billion blow to the local economy, according to the city’s mayor.Germany, which had the smallest rise in new cases this month in the 24 hours through Tuesday morning, started to allow small stores and some other retailers to reopen on Monday and will weigh next steps on April 30. France will unveil plans within two weeks to progressively lift restrictions amid falling numbers of patients in hospitals and in intensive care, and Spain plans to loosen rules for children.The European Union cautioned against complacency. Health Commissioner Stella Kyriakides said containment efforts that end too quickly and aren’t coordinated across the bloc could threaten the sacrifices made by citizens and medical staff.As part of efforts to develop a vaccine, European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen will host an online event on May 4 to generate funding pledges and mobilize investment necessary for research into effective treatments, she told the European Parliament’s health committee.The pressures facing policy makers are evident in Austria. Despite being one of the first European nations to ease restrictions, the economy may take as long as three years to recover, according to a group of leading economists. Unemployment and state-wage support have skyrocketed, with almost every third worker receiving some form of subsidy due to the pandemic.After allowing small shops and hardware stores to open from April 14, Austria will let all other retailers resume operations in May and will begin to reopen schools, restaurants and places of worship May 15.Conte said that his cabinet is working with various experts to coordinate the so-called “phase 2,” when Italians will have to adapt to the lingering threat of the virus, such as maintaining social-distancing guidelines and wearing masks in public.The plan could include a full reopening of stores on May 11 or more likely May 18, La Repubblica reported. Full movement for citizens would only come after that, the newspaper said.The lockdown is crippling an already fragile and debt-ridden economy. In an attempt to obtain some relief, Conte will make another push for so-called coronabonds, or joint debt issuance, at a virtual gathering of European Union leaders on Thursday.Italy’s easing plan will be laid out at the national level but will take into account regional differences, according to the country’s leader.“I would like to be able to say: we will open everything. Immediately. Tomorrow morning,” Conte said in a post on Facebook. “But a decision like that would be irresponsible” and could “jeopardize all the efforts we’ve made until now.”(Updates with new Italian’ cases and recoveries from second paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.



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Zimbabwe president threatens 20 years jail over fake lockdown statement

Zimbabwe president threatens 20 years jail over fake lockdown statementZimbabwe’s President Emmerson Mnangagwa on Tuesday threatened 20 years in jail to the author of a statement purporting to bear his signature that said the lockdown to contain the coronavirus outbreak had been extended. Mnangagwa, who was speaking at his farm after touring Gweru city in central Zimbabwe, told state broadcaster ZBC he had not extended the 21-day lockdown. National police spokesman Paul Nyathi said more than 5,000 people had been arrested for venturing outside their homes without permission but denied security forces had abused residents.



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Paraguayans go hungry as coronavirus lockdown ravages livelihoods

Paraguayans go hungry as coronavirus lockdown ravages livelihoodsEarly, aggressive measures seem to be controlling the disease but the pandemic has laid bare the country’s social inequalities * Coronavirus – latest updates * See all our coronavirus coverageWhen Covid-19 arrived in South America, Paraguay was one of the first countries to take measures to contain the virus, closing schools and banning public gatherings after just the second confirmed case on 11 March.The nationwide lockdown seems to be controlling the spread of the disease, but it has created another problem: large numbers of Paraguayans are going hungry in their own homes.Paraguay has reported some of the lowest infection rates in South America – currently 129 confirmed cases and six deaths.But the government of President Mario Abdo Benítez has been heavily criticised for failing to support people left without income during the total quarantine – which is now coming to the end of the third week and is set to continue until 19 April.Sixty-five per cent of Paraguay’s workers earn their living in the informal economy and have no access to benefits during the coronavirus crisis.And while the government has been authorised to secure loans of $ 1.6bn to face the crisis, only a small part of a promised scheme of emergency payments of about $ 76 and food packs have reached those left in need. A further payment scheme is yet to be implemented.Valentina Osuna, a craftswoman and mother of four from the indigenous Qom village of Rosarino, said she was no longer able to sell her work.“There’s no support, there’s nothing from the state. My children are hungry.”Abdo Benítez has apologised for the situation and called for patience. But when he briefly boarded a public bus last week to greet passengers, he was heckled with demands for the promised support payments.The scale of the crisis has been shown by the recent launch of AyudaPy – an open-source, non-governmental website allowing users to request and offer help. Thousands of messages are being posted daily by people describing dire circumstances and requesting basic items like milk, bread and medicine.Óscar Pereira, member of a residents’ organisation in the deprived Tacumbú neighbourhood of Asunción, the capital, said: “The mutual solidarity on display is outstanding; poor people are helping other poor people. We’re all helping and giving what we can: we’re cooking communally so that we can get food to people.”As it has across Latin America, the coronavirus crisis has laid bare social inequalities and the poor state of public infrastructure. Amid widespread outrage, the government has promised a reform of a state that is underfunded and plagued by corruption and highly skewed tax policies.However, for Alicia Amarilla, national coordinator of the Organisation of Rural and Indigenous Women, not even promises of reform can guarantee greater dignity for Paraguay’s many poor families.“We’re going to see many more difficult situations come from this crisis – we’re in a country with far too much inequality. We know that the government won’t take privileges away from those that have them. The people who are most in need are the ones who will continue suffering.”



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Erdogan rejects Turkish minister's resignation after coronavirus lockdown criticism

Erdogan rejects Turkish minister's resignation after coronavirus lockdown criticismPresident Tayyip Erdogan rejected the resignation on Sunday of Turkey’s interior minister, who said he was stepping down in the wake of a short-notice coronavirus lockdown which sent people rushing to shops to stock up on supplies. “The incidents that occurred ahead of the implementation of the curfew were not befitting the perfect management of the outbreak,” Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu said in statement on Twitter in which he said he was resigning. Erdogan, however, judged it was not “appropriate” for Soylu to resign and the minister would continue in his position, the presidency said shortly afterwards.



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'There are two pandemics': Chicago's gun violence persists amid lockdown

'There are two pandemics': Chicago's gun violence persists amid lockdownShootings and murders have remained fairly consistent during shelter-in-place, with the city registering more shootings in March than the previous year * Coronavirus – live US updates * Live global updates * See all our coronavirus coverageThe coronavirus pandemic has forced Chicago into lockdown, closing restaurants, bars, stores and even its celebrated lakefront. But the crisis hasn’t slowed the city’s devastating gun violence epidemic.While crime overall has ticked down slightly amid shelter-in-place orders from local leaders, shootings and murders have remained fairly consistent so far, with the city registering more shootings in March this year than the previous year.During the first weekend of April, two were killed and 18 were wounded, mostly on the city’s predominantly black and brown South and West Sides. On Tuesday, as unseasonably warm temperatures in Chicago rose into the 80sF (27C), the city endured its most violent day of 2020, with at least 21 shot – including a five-year-old girl – and six killed.“Violence of any kind is never acceptable,” the mayor, Lori Lightfoot, said at a news conference this week decrying the violence. “But the fact that this is especially urgent right now as our ability to treat all Chicagoans is being stretched to the breaking point, we cannot allow this to happen and we will not allow this to happen.”The ongoing violence in America’s third-largest city puts additional strain to a healthcare system struggling to combat the novel coronavirus – and could be exacerbated by the pandemic that has dramatically altered life in the city for the foreseeable future.default “Anger, frustration and depression doesn’t get put on hold while there’s a pandemic going on,” said Pastor Michael Pfleger of St Sabina, on the city’s South Side. “It’s still there, and it’s heightened right now. All it does is heighten the reality of the neglect.”The coronavirus has brought to the fore the existing racial disparities in Chicago, with black residents representing a majority of Covid-19 deaths in the city and Cook county. Experts fear that the health and economic impacts of the pandemic may worsen the structural conditions that feed the violence issues, compounding the city’s already pronounced race and class inequalities.“I think there’s going to be a lasting impact on this, even beyond the direct public health impact of Covid,” said Max Kapustin, senior researcher at the University of Chicago Crime Lab.The continued violence comes as hospitals in Chicago, like New York and other communities across the US that have been hit hard so far by the outbreak, grapple with a pandemic that has stretched their limited resources.Illinois’s governor, JB Pritzker, has warned that intensive care unit beds are filling up quickly and that the state needs more ventilators, as the total number of confirmed coronavirus cases here rises above 15,000 and its death toll nears 500.“Every one of those beds, every one of those ER beds, taken up by a gunshot victim could be somebody’s grandmother, somebody with pre-existing conditions, somebody that is in danger of losing their lives because of the pandemic,” Charlie Beck, the city’s interim police chief, said in a news conference with Lightfoot.“There are two pandemics in Chicago,” Beck said, “and only one is virus-induced.”> Anger, frustration and depression doesn’t get put on hold while there’s a pandemic going on> > Pastor Michael PflegerAt Mount Sinai hospital in Douglas Park on Chicago’s West Side, one of the busiest trauma centers in the country, the dueling crises of Covid-19 and gun violence have stretched staff and resources.Even for longtime medical professionals at the facility on the frontline of the city’s violence epidemic, the coronavirus pandemic has been shocking.“I’m amazed by it,” said Michele Mazurek, chief nurse officer and vice-president of patient care services. “We’re used to trauma patients here. Covid is almost like its own trauma itself.”The continued gun violence has forced the hospital to put into place its surge plan, with educators, nurse practitioners and Mazurek herself providing patient care at the hospital.“The influx sometimes is incredible,” Mazurek said. “It is stressing on our emergency room.”Mount Sinai officials said it has been able to maintain a high level of care despite the obstacles, thanks to the efforts of staff. But, they said, the situation has already taken a toll on healthcare workers.“I’ve been a nurse since 1993,” Mazurek said. “This has been the hardest experience I’ve ever lived through.”As of Wednesday, Chicago had seen a reported 550 shootings in 2020 – up 64 from last year. That number will probably continue to grow, particularly as the weather warms into the summer months, when violence in the city tends to spike.“Unfortunately, the epidemic of gun violence continues to plague us every day, every hour of the day,” Lightfoot said on Wednesday. “This level of violence is never acceptable. Never, ever.”



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Animal shelters say in coronavirus lockdown people are looking for new friends

Animal shelters say in coronavirus lockdown people are looking for new friendsKelsey Pierce, a musician and songwriter in New York City, had always wanted to foster a dog with her roommate, Allyson Backus, but because of their busy schedules it was never a real possibility. Since all of New York is currently on a stay-at-home order because of the coronavirus pandemic, the pair were finally able to take on a furry friend. 



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India to go under total virus lockdown, says PM Modi

India to go under total virus lockdown, says PM ModiIndia’s 1.3 billion people will go under “total lockdown” for 21 days to combat the spread of the coronavirus pandemic, Prime Minister Narendra Modi said Tuesday, sparking panic buying with shoppers clearing out shelves. “From 12 midnight today (1830 GMT Tuesday), the entire country will be in lockdown, total lockdown,” Modi said in a national television address to the world’s second most-populous nation. “To save India, to save its every citizen, you, your family… every street, every neighbourhood is being put under lockdown.”



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