Tag Archives: Biden

Biden faces balancing act as activists call to 'defund the police'

Biden faces balancing act as activists call to 'defund the police'Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden said Monday he opposes “defunding the police,” declining to embrace a rallying cry that has gained support among progressive activists and protesters demonstrating against police brutality. The growing calls to dismantle or reimagine U.S. police departments have put pressure on Biden and other Democratic leaders, who favor policing reforms but are wary of adopting a loaded phrase that some Democrats fear could be a divisive election issue. President Donald Trump and other Republicans have seized on the “defund the police” slogan to suggest Democrats are bending to extremists at the expense of public safety.



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Team Trump ‘Desperately’ Wants Bush to Endorse Biden. Some Dems Love the Idea, Too.

Team Trump ‘Desperately’ Wants Bush to Endorse Biden. Some Dems Love the Idea, Too.President Donald Trump and his political lieutenants are privately hoping that former President George W. Bush will endorse Joe Biden this cycle, creating a bizarre confluence of interests with an increasing number of Democrats who are hoping for the same.To Team Trump, a Bush endorsement of Biden would allow them to hitch a formerly unpopular GOP president and the personification of dynastic politics to the Democratic Party’s 2020 ticket. They believe that Bush’s backing would drive the progressive wing of the party into a tizzy, especially if the Democratic nominee were to accept and promote it, creating internal strife for Biden at a time when he needs unity. According to two people familiar with his private remarks on the matter, Trump has said it would be “fun” if he could effectively run against both Bush and Biden. These sources with knowledge of the president’s thinking say he views both Biden and Bush as emblematic of the political establishment that he successfully ran against in the last election, and that Trump continues to harbor a visceral distaste for members of the Bush family and administration.“We would LOVE him to officially endorse Biden,” messaged a source close to the White House adding it “would be such a gift to us” citing the 43rd president’s legacy on trade, big government policies, and “constant war.”One senior Trump campaign official even said that some on the team “desperately” wanted the 43rd president of the United States to come out for Biden 2020, as it would make for easy messaging fodder. “I imagine we want it about as much as a lot of Biden people would not want it,” the official said.The New York Times reported Saturday that, among other Republicans struggling with an endorsement decision, the former president would not support Trump’s re-election efforts, citing people familiar with the situation. A spokesman for Bush told The Texas Tribune that the Times’ assertion was “false.”Bush certainly left the White House as a deeply unpopular figure, under the cloud of disastrous wars, various scandals, and a cratered economy. But his standing has improved in his years away from the political scene, including among Democratic voters. And on the few occasions he has waded back into public life, he has conveyed a more socially conscious approach to national affairs, including offering his recent support for ending systemic racism in police forces. Over time, the previously unthinkable has begun to happen, with prominent Democrats warming up to him and—now—the idea that an endorsement from him could provide an assist to the Democrats’ White House chances. “Our task is to build the broadest coalition possible,” Rep. Ro Khanna (D-CA), a leading House progressive and former co-chair of Sen. Bernie Sanders’ (I-VT) presidential campaign, told The Daily Beast about a hypothetical endorsement. “I began my career in public service running against Bush’s war in Iraq in 2004. But no one doubts his commitment to tolerance and inclusiveness.”Khanna argued that Bush is in a “different moral league” than Trump, particularly in regard to the latter’s fondness for promoting “divisiveness” and “fearmongering.” “His endorsement would help to highlight the enormous stakes in 2020 for our democracy,” he said. Former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell, a top Biden booster, said he would “welcome” the endorsement, arguing that the public embracing of a high-profile Republican could have an electoral upside in critical swing states. “Ninety percent of Trump’s vote is the base. And the base isn’t going to care what George Bush says,” Rendell said. “Then there’s the 10 percent of Independents, suburban Republicans that stuck with him. … The question is: what effect does a George Bush endorsement have with them? I’d say, it adds weight to the entire picture that’s growing. I don’t think there’s any blowback on our side.”Ellen Defends Laughing It Up With George W. Bush at Cowboys GameIt is unclear if Bush will end up endorsing anyone for president this year, and he could very well sit on the sidelines and merely refuse to publicly support Trump’s reelection. According to a New York Times story published this weekend, Bush “won’t support the re-election of Mr. Trump.” But a Bush spokesperson told The Texas Tribune that the detail in the Times’ piece was “false.”Bush is hardly a Republican turncoat, having fundraised for conservative House and Senate candidates in the 2018 midterm elections in an effort to help preserve GOP congressional majorities—which, had it been successful in the House, would have preserved Trump’s sway on Capitol Hill. But his distaste for Trump has been evident for some time. And, in this case, the animus goes both ways. Two White House officials said they simply couldn’t care what Bush did or didn’t do ahead of this election, casting him as a trivial media obsession. “Elections are about the future, not the past,” said Ed Brookover, a former senior Trump adviser during the 2016 race. “President Bush performed well during his two terms, but people judge today’s candidates in today’s world. President Trump receives support from many voters who supported President Bush, as well as voters he pulled into his own orbit. President Trump’s policies and actions represent a new brand of leadership, which America has been needing for quite a while.”Dubya Was Bad, but the Donald Might Be Worse: Richard ClarkeFor Biden, the risks of accepting a Bush endorsement are fairly clear. The association with the Iraq War (which Biden supported), the use of torture, and the handling of Hurricane Katrina, alone, represents a heaping of political baggage that could outweigh any benefit. And some progressives were clear that they would struggle with having a president they had deeply reviled in their proverbial corner. “George W. Bush is a war criminal who lied to the American people in order to illegally invade a country. If nothing else, for that reason alone, I would never support accepting his endorsement,” said Charlotte Clymer, a LGBTQ activist who previously backed Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and has since thrown her weight behind Biden. But even Clymer found a bigger upside to the idea of an endorsement for party purposes, saying she wouldn’t be surprised to see Biden accept it “in order to remove our greatest national security threat in modern history: Donald Trump.”And among more establishment Democrats, the choice to welcome a potential boost from Bush now was seen as a no-brainer. “No one can ever accuse me of being a fan of former President George W. Bush,” said Jim Manley, a longtime senior Democratic Senate aide who served as Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid’s spokesman during the latter Bush years. “But as far as I’m concerned, it would be fantastic if he were to come out and support the vice president. It would serve as a powerful rebuke to the current president.”James Carville, a former top adviser to President Bill Clinton’s 1992 campaign who is now advising the pro-Biden Democratic group American Bridge, responded enthusiastically about the prospect of a Bush endorsement for the presumptive Democratic nominee.“I fought with these guys during impeachment, I fought with these guys on the Iraq War, I fought with these guys left and right,” Carville said. “We’re in a different situation now. We have a deadly pathogen that’s infected this country and we got to get rid of it.”Put another way, Carville said: “What did Churchill say? ‘If Hitler invaded hell, I would side with the devil.’” Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



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Biden sexual assault claim divides Democrats as Republicans pounce

Biden sexual assault claim divides Democrats as Republicans pounceWhile high-profile Democrats voice support for the presumptive presidential nominee, some progressives call for a closer look at Tara Reade’s allegationsThe allegations of sexual misconduct by Tara Reade against the former vice-president Joe Biden have caused new fault lines within the Democratic party, especially between its left wing and the establishment.Reade is a former Biden Senate staffer who has accused the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee of sexually assaulting her while she worked in his office in the 1990s. Biden and his campaign have flatly denied the allegations and major news outlets have continued to investigate.Meanwhile, liberal grassroots activists have clashed with centrist Democrats and senior party figures over how to respond to the allegations. The arguments often point to how Democrats approached previous high-profile sexual assault allegations, such as the accusations by Christine Blasey Ford against Brett Kavanaugh during the now supreme court justice’s contentious confirmation hearings.Peter Daou, a Democratic strategist who has argued that the “Democratic establishment” has moved to undercut Reade’s allegations, said three basic factions had emerged.“You have Biden’s opponents on the Republican side and they’re going to seize on this,” Daou said, adding that there was also “the left – progressives and leftists” who want to see Reade’s allegations taken more seriously, and then the Democratic party establishment figures who are trying to undermine Reade. The latter group, Daou said, is “just absolutely wedded to Biden right now, will not let go, so they’ll defend him at all costs – even if that means completely destroying the MeToo movement”.Daou pointed out that other women have accused Biden of unwanted touching. In response to those accusations, Biden has said he would work to better respect other people’s personal spaces.Republicans have been eager to confront as many rank-and-file Democratic politicians as possible with the allegations. The National Republican Congressional Committee has been blasting out emails targeting specific Democratic House candidates over Reade’s claims.The subject line of a Friday email from the NRCC read: “Why does McBath not believe Tara Reade?” It asked why the Georgia congresswoman Lucy McBath was “yet to say whether she’ll stand by her endorsement of Biden amidst allegations of sexual assault, although she was quick to support Dr Ford during the Kavanaugh hearings”.Similar questions are being asked by progressives and some more moderate Democratic party leaders. David Sirota, a former speechwriter and senior strategist for Bernie Sanders, has argued that Democrats have been too eager to discount Reade’s allegations.A small group of insurgent Democratic congressional candidates have begun to raise concerns that Reade’s allegations are not being taken seriously enough. Rebecca Parson, a liberal Democrat challenging the Washington state congressman Derek Kilmer, said in an interview on Friday that Biden should step down over Reade’s allegations. Parson said she believes Reade and thinks the charges create too much of a vulnerability for Biden in the 2020 presidential election.“I want to defeat Donald Trump in November and yes, I’m a progressive and I’m in the left-wing of the party, but something that really unites the people in the centrist wing and the progressive wing is we all want to defeat Trump,” Parson said. “I don’t think we do that with somebody who has all these allegations against him, especially because Donald Trump has assault allegations against him and unfortunately with Donald Trump, Trump doesn’t care about being a hypocrite.”Parson added: “I think that Biden should withdraw and any one or more of the candidates who aren’t running should restart their campaign because the Democratic primary isn’t over yet.”Those arguments aren’t shared by many of the most high-profile figures in the Democratic party. The New York senator Kirsten Gillibrand, a leading advocate against sexual harassment and sexual assault, told reporters on Tuesday that she supported Biden amid the allegations.“So when we say believe women, it’s for this explicit intention of making sure there’s space for all women to come forward to speak their truth, to be heard. And in this allegation, that is what Tara Reade has done,” Gillibrand said, according to CNN. “She has come forward, she has spoken, and they have done an investigation in several outlets. Those investigations Vice-President Biden has called for himself. Vice-President Biden has vehemently denied these allegations and I support Vice-President Biden.”The former Georgia state house minority leader Democrat Stacey Abrams also said she believed Biden.“The New York Times did a deep investigation and they found that the accusation was not credible. I believe Joe Biden,” Abrams said in late April.Others, including the Massachusetts senator Elizabeth Warren and Michigan governor Gretchen Whitmer, have also said they support Biden in response to Reade’s allegations.But Parson is not alone in arguing that at this point Biden should drop out of the race. A Politico/Morning Consult poll found that over a third of Democratic voters surveyed say the party should switch out Biden as their presumptive nominee because of the allegations.Other Democrats argued that Biden can both adequately address Reade’s allegations and still be a viable opponent against Trump. The Massachusetts congresswoman Ayanna Pressley, a progressive favorite, wrote a Medium post arguing that the allegations can be examined without undercutting Biden’s chances of beating Trump.“I reject the false choice that my party and our nominee can’t address the allegations at hand and defeat the occupant of the White House,” Pressley wrote.



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Top House Democrat Says Tara Reade Allegation against Biden Should Be ‘Investigated Seriously’

Top House Democrat Says Tara Reade Allegation against Biden Should Be ‘Investigated Seriously’Representative Hakeem Jeffries, the chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, said Wednesday that the sexual-assault allegation against Joe Biden must be “investigated seriously” and that Biden will likely have to address the claim directly.“It’s got to be taken seriously because this is a serious allegation raised by a serious individual and needs to be investigated seriously. We’ve probably got to hear from him [Biden] at some point directly,” Jeffries said Wednesday on WNYC when asked about Tara Reade's claim that Biden sexually assaulted her when she worked for him as a Senate staffer. “I’m not really in a position to say what is the appropriate mechanism, although this needs to be taken seriously.”Reade alleges that in 1993, when she was a Senate staff assistant for Biden, she was told by a top staffer to bring Biden a duffel bag in a Senate building, and when she met with him he pinned her against a wall and penetrated her with his fingers while forcibly kissing her. In early April of last year, before he announced his run for the Democratic nomination, Reade alleged along with several other women that Biden had touched her inappropriately.Several other top Democrats have stood by the presumptive Democratic nominee as he has denied the allegations, including House speaker Nancy Pelosi, New York senator Kirsten Gillibrand, and former Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams, who is considered one of the contenders to be Biden's running mate.“He’s devoted his life to supporting women, and he has vehemently denied this allegation,” Gillibrand said.“I’m satisfied with how he has responded. I know him. I was proud to endorse him on Monday,” Pelosi said.“I know Joe Biden and I think he's telling the truth and this did not happen,” Abrams said during a CNN appearance.Biden will reportedly appear on MSNBC's Morning Joe and address the allegations on Friday.



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Don Lemon Grills Stacey Abrams on Joe Biden Sexual Assault Allegation

Don Lemon Grills Stacey Abrams on Joe Biden Sexual Assault AllegationStacey Abrams has made her ambition to be Joe Biden’s running mate abundantly clear over the last couple of weeks. And to that end, she offered the presumptive Democratic nominee her unwavering support when questioned by CNN’s Don Lemon about the sexual assault allegation against Biden on Tuesday night.  “As someone who wants to be his vice president, I think it’s important that we speak about something that’s in the news now,” Lemon said near the end of his conversation with the former Georgia gubernatorial candidate, before laying out the details of Tara Reade’s claim. “CNN has now spoken on the record with her former neighbor who says Reade told her about the allegation within a few years of the alleged incident,” Lemon said. “Biden’s campaign says untrue, never happened. Is this a credible allegation?” “I believe that women deserve to be heard and I believe that they need to be listened to,” Abrams said carefully. “But I also believe that those allegations have to be investigated by credible sources.” She cited an in-depth New York Times investigation that found the accusation was “not credible,” though new information has emerged in the two weeks since it was published. “I believe Joe Biden,” Abrams said. “I believe that he is a person who has demonstrated that his love of family, his love of our community, has been made perfectly clear through his work as a congressional leader and as an American leader. I know Joe Biden and I think he's telling the truth and that this did not happen.” With her conclusion, Abrams appeared to be parroting official Biden campaign talking points, which read, in part, “Biden believes that all women have the right to be heard and to have their claims thoroughly reviewed. In this case, a thorough review by the New York Times has led to the truth: this incident did not happen.”Stephen Colbert Grills Bernie Sanders: Are You Endorsing Biden or Not?Lemon could have left things there, but instead he confronted Abrams with a tweet she posted in 2018 that condemned Senate Republicans for “rushing” Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court confirmation forward despite the “courageous and compelling testimony from Dr. Christine Blasey Ford.” “Are you applying a different standard now?” Lemon asked. “Not at all,” Abrams replied. “I believed then and I believe now that women deserve to be heard because too often they are not. And Tara Reade deserved to have her story listened to and investigated. What was happening with Christine Blasey Ford was there there was no investigation. There was a rush to move it forward so no investigation was conducted.” “So you said you’ve heard her, you’ve heard enough, you don’t believe her, you believe Joe Biden,” Lemon said.After once again returning to the Times investigation, Abrams said, “I believe the Biden I know. And I think he will make women proud, that he will make America proud.” Asked if Biden needs to “address this more directly and more publicly,” Abrams said, “I believe his campaign has been very clear. And I believe that is the approach that they intend to take and I support the approach. “We don’t want women to ever be afraid to come forward,” she concluded. “But we also have to recognize that allegations should be investigated and that those investigations need to be borne out.” Anderson Cooper Dumbfounded by Trump’s ‘Sarcasm’ Excuse: Does He Think We’re ‘Morons’Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



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Stacey Abrams Is the Only Vice Presidential Pick for Joe Biden. Here’s Why.

Stacey Abrams Is the Only Vice Presidential Pick for Joe Biden. Here’s Why.Joe Biden pledged he would choose a woman as his running mate, and that woman needs to be Stacey Abrams.The road to the White House for Democrats only exists with the support and excitement of black voters—black female voters to be specific. Just ask Bernie Sanders. He thought he could carve a path to the nomination without overwhelming support among the Democratic base—black voters. He was wrong.Sure, other Democratic voters matter. Lots of ink has been spilled about the importance of “suburban” Democratic voters, read white voters, even though blacks have been moving to the suburbs at great rates as they’ve been pushed out of cities for years now. However, any viable Democratic strategy rests on the active participation and interest of diverse groups of black voters.Biden made a promise to select a female running mate, a declarative statement some feel may have painted the former veep into a corner. There are several qualified women on the Democratic bench, but only Abrams can deliver the significant number of black voters across the United States to galvanize the base and articulate a clear vision. Several women are qualified to assist Biden in the governance phase of a possible Biden presidency, but only Abrams assists fully with the two-stage process of a successful Democratic presidency– campaigning and then governance. I don’t think Democrats want or need another Tim Kaine moment. That is, selecting a running mate who would be fine for governing but brings relatively little to the ticket during the campaign stage. Kaine would have served the nation dutifully, and he possessed the intellect to assist Hillary Clinton in White House strategic matters. However, the lack of excitement about Kaine and his inability to connect with the Democratic base was yet another Achilles heel for the Clinton campaign.The 2020 election season is already unprecedented, and now more than ever, Biden needs to select a running mate who has the gift of reaching diverse demographics of voters and connecting with them on a myriad of levels. He needs a storyteller, a leader, a robust fundraiser, and a running mate who can contextualize the past and present and present a clear outline for the future. Anyone who has heard Abrams speak for more than five minutes is sold on her policy acumen and her ability to present realistic solutions to decades-long problems pertaining to the institution of poverty, criminal justice, and economic exclusion. As more Americans find themselves slipping out of their tenuous middle-class identity, Biden needs a partner who can lay out arguments in a way that is accessible, realistic, compassionate, and policy-driven.The Democrats have not shown their eagerness for innovation in this presidential cycle. The overwhelming Democratic primary support for Biden is a clear indication that a majority of Democratic voters who bothered to participate are not willing to dramatically change course. However, Biden cannot afford to isolate and alienate the more progressive wing of Democratic voters or voters who are concerned that this septuagenarian may need some critical assistance galvanizing Democratic voters and delivering a hybrid of Democratic policy needs and desires. It is imperative Biden choose someone with leadership experience who can explain to voters the values and ideals of the Democratic Party. Let’s actually discuss Abrams’ qualifications, since many believe the only viable candidates for the presidency or vice presidency should be sitting governors or senators. There has been a desire for Biden to choose a running mate with “executive experience.” To that I would ask that we dissect the type of executive experience we are looking for. As I wrote about Abrams previously for The Daily Beast, she was a Truman Scholar and received her law degree at Yale. She was elected to the Georgia state house in 2006 and began serving as House Democratic leader in 2011. She’s been a trailblazer and visionary rolled into one. When she saw that 800,000 people of color in Georgia were not registered to vote, she launched the New Georgia Project, registering more than 200,000 Georgians in just two years. When she noticed there was a dearth of businesses run by women and people of color, she and a friend launched the NOW Account, a program to help small businesses grow and spur innovation in the aftermath of the 2008 recession, creating and maintaining over 2,000 jobs from over 350 small businesses in Georgia.In a post-COVID America, Biden will need a right hand who can assist him in thinking of the economics of the working class and formerly middle class. He will also need someone who has experience with innovation rooted in empathy. As the current administration has made abundantly clear, cruelty and personal financial gain is the foundation of the vast majority of their policy decisions. He also needs a veep who can unite the party, someone who can galvanize the more progressive wing of the party concerned with issues like criminal justice and the environment.During the 2018 campaign, Abrams and her team built an extensive grassroots campaign strategy that extended across the 159 counties in Georgia and included the highest rates of youth and Latino participation the state had ever seen. Since the election, Abrams and her team launched Fair Fight, an organization dedicated to litigation, legislation, and advocacy in order to support voter-protection programs at state parties around the country. The oft-repeated question surrounding Abrams’ qualifications often relates to concerns pertaining to Biden’s age and Abrams’ ability to step up and step in if the moment arises. To answer those questions, I would say that if you doubt Abrams’ qualifications I might ask what exactly you are looking for in a candidate. Abrams has a successful record in business, nonprofits, leadership, governance, and policy innovation. And we must not forget grassroots organizing and mutli-ethnic and multi-generational coalition building. In a post-COVID world, the traditional résumé of a candidate is outdated. Critics also question how Abrams will poll nationally. If her ability to fundraise across the country and connect with young voters and voters of color in her various voter-mobilization organizational efforts are any indication, Biden should do all he can to secure Abrams as his No. 2. And let’s be honest, if the 2018 Georgia governors’ race was not hijacked by Brian Kemp, there would be no question as to whether Abrams should be the Democratic nominee for vice president, or even president. American democracy cannot afford another 2016 election, when, for example, black voters in Michigan were so uninspired they either stayed home or decided to vote down ballot and ignore the top of the ticket. The democracy cannot afford a party that is not equipped to address the rampant voter suppression and disenfranchisement efforts affecting marginalized communities in states across the nation. For the past two years, Abrams and Fair Fight have been dedicated to mitigating the rampant voter-suppression efforts in states across the country. There are several sitting elected officials who are talented and have bright futures ahead of them. Gov. Gretchen Whitmer of Michigan, Sens. Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin, Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Kamala Harris of California, New Jersey Lt. Gov. Sheila Oliver, and Rep. Val Demings of Florida all come to mind. However, none of these women can galvanize the type of base Biden needs for success. None possess the multiple skill sets to simultaneously galvanize the progressive wing of the party, the South, and the black base. Sure, some may wonder if Abrams can deliver since she did not win her home state of Georgia when she ran for governor in 2018 against a sitting secretary of state who controlled the electoral ballots and the entire voting process. Even with almost 2 million votes and the highest Democratic turnout in modern history, Abrams was not able to win the game against Brian Kemp, who served as her opponent, the referee, the judge, and the man in charge of the equipment. There is no need to relitigate that shameful display of democracy stolen. If you truly believe Kemp is the rightful recipient of the Georgia governor’s seat, I have several bridges to sell you. Venmo me. Now is not the time for a safety pick. If we know black voters will be the deciding factor in several swing states, it is imperative Biden have a running mate who can inspire and motivate Democratic voters to turn out on Nov. 3 and assist in governance every day after that.Christina Greer, Ph.D., is an associate professor at Fordham University, political editor at The Grio, the author of Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration, and the Pursuit of the American Dream, and the co-host of the podcast FAQ-NYC. Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



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Biden looks to placate Sanders by letting him keep delegates

Biden looks to placate Sanders by letting him keep delegatesSeeking to avoid the bitter feelings that marred the 2016 Democratic convention, Joe Biden’s campaign is angling to allow Bernie Sanders to keep some of the delegates he would otherwise forfeit by dropping out of the presidential race. Under a strict application of party rules, Sanders should lose about a third of the delegates he’s won in primaries and caucuses as the process moves ahead and states select the actual people who will attend the Democratic National Convention. The rules say those delegates should be Biden supporters, as he is the only candidate still actively seeking the party’s nomination.



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Poll: Trump approval rating rises, but more Americans support Biden for president

Poll: Trump approval rating rises, but more Americans support Biden for presidentThe number of Americans who approve of President Trump rose by 5 percentage points over the past week, but registered voters still favored Democrat Joe Biden for president by a small margin, according to a Reuters/Ipsos opinion poll released on Tuesday.



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Biden tells Sanders in endorsement live stream, 'You don't get enough credit, Bernie'

Biden tells Sanders in endorsement live stream, 'You don't get enough credit, Bernie'Former Vice President Joe Biden praised Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) in a live stream Monday after officially securing his endorsement, telling the Vermont senator he doesn't "get enough credit."Sanders remotely joined Biden for a live stream after Sanders announced last week he was suspending his campaign for president. Sanders offered Biden his endorsement, something Biden called a "big deal" while telling Sanders "you just made me" the Democratic nominee and heaping praise on his former primary competitor."You've been the most powerful voice for a fair and more just America," Biden told Sanders. "…You don't get enough credit, Bernie, for being the voice that forces us to take a hard look in the mirror and ask ourselves, 'Have we done enough?' And we haven't."Biden, who during the stream said it's not "good enough" to go "back to the way things were before" after the coronavirus crisis, also embraced Sanders' 2020 campaign slogan of "not me, us" and asked the senator's supporters to join him."Thank you for being so generous," Biden told Sanders. "I give you my word, I'll try my best not to let you all down."After the live stream, the Trump campaign in a statement said this endorsement news is "further proof that even though Bernie Sanders won't be on the ballot in November, his issues will be." Meanwhile, Briahna Joy Gray, former national press secretary for the Sanders campaign, tweeted that because Biden doesn't support issues like Medicare-for-all, "With the utmost respect for Bernie Sanders, who is an incredible human being and a genuine inspiration, I don't endorse Joe Biden." > NEW: Joe Biden praises Bernie Sanders: "You don't get enough credit, Bernie, for being the voice that forces us to take a hard look in the mirror and ask ourselves: 'Have we done enough?' And we haven't." https://t.co/35Zg7cQ9nU pic.twitter.com/Ebb5UAlTTS> > — ABC News (@ABC) April 13, 2020More stories from theweek.com Trump adviser Peter Navarro made a bad bet 60 Minutes didn't cover pandemic preparedness under Obama Fauci says he used the 'wrong choice of words' when describing 'pushback' from White House Trump might fire the one person in the White House who knows what he's doing



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Former Senate staffer accuses Joe Biden of sexual assault

Former Senate staffer accuses Joe Biden of sexual assaultA former aide to Joe Biden is accusing the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee of sexually assaulting her during the early 1990s when he was a senator. In two recent interviews with The Associated Press, Tara Reade alleged the assault occurred in the basement of a Capitol Hill office building in the spring of 1993. It’s not the first time Reade has made an accusation against the former vice president.



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Biden Says November Election Can’t Be Delayed: Campaign Update

Biden Says November Election Can’t Be Delayed: Campaign Update(Bloomberg) — Joe Biden said unequivocally Tuesday the November election couldn’t be delayed because of the coronavirus pandemic.“We cannot delay or postpone a constitutionally required election,” Biden said in an interview on NBC’s “Today.”Biden, the likely Democratic presidential nominee, repeated his calls for states to plan ahead for remote voting options, including expanding vote by mail. The former vice president said he hoped people can vote in person, but it would “depend on the state of play.”“We’re going to have to conduct the election on November 3,” he said.Biden’s comments come as voters in Wisconsin stood in line to vote in the state’s primary Tuesday after the Republican-controlled legislature refused the governor’s request to delay in-person voting amid a stay-at-home order.John Lewis, Civil Rights Icon, Endorses Biden (5:30 a.m.)Representative John Lewis of Georgia, an icon of the Civil Rights movement, endorsed Joe Biden on Tuesday, becoming the latest Democrat to support the former vice president as he tries to wrap up the Democratic presidential nomination.Lewis’ endorsement comes as Biden has amassed a nearly insurmountable lead in delegates over his only remaining competitor, Senator Bernie Sanders. Biden is looking to extend that lead Tuesday when Wisconsin holds its primary contest.Lewis has represented Georgia in Congress for more than 30 years, after serving as one of the leaders of the American civil rights movement. He was the chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and worked with the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to organize the March on Washington in 1963.“I have stared down the deepest, and darkest forces in this nation,” Lewis said in a statement. “Vice President Joe Biden and I both believe that we are in a fight to redeem the soul of America. I know Joe Biden as a man of character and dignity – A man who can not, and will not rest when he sees injustice in our American home.”In December, Lewis, 80, announced he had been diagnosed with stage four pancreatic cancer, but last month, he made a surprise appearance in Selma, Alabama, joining Biden and many other Democratic presidential candidates, to mark the 55th anniversary of “Bloody Sunday,” when peaceful marchers were attacked by the police. Lewis himself was beaten and badly injured.“We must go out and vote like we never, ever voted before,” Lewis said at the commemoration.Georgia’s Democratic primary was initially scheduled for March 24, but it was pushed back to May 19 because of the coronavirus pandemic. — Tyler PagerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.



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Biden Running Mate? Party Leaders Favor Former Female Rivals

Biden Running Mate? Party Leaders Favor Former Female RivalsWASHINGTON — With former Vice President Joe Biden now holding an all but insurmountable lead over Sen. Bernie Sanders in the presidential primary contest, many Democrats have shifted their attention to a favorite quadrennial parlor game: the vice-presidential search.Biden has shown his hand in a big and unusual way for a front-runner, saying he would pick a woman as a running mate. That has opened the path for Democratic officials to start picking favorites — from a socially safe distance.In discussions with The Times since Biden's big primary victories on Tuesday, 60 Democratic National Committee members and congressional and party leaders most frequently proposed three former rivals of Biden as his running mate — Sen. Kamala Harris of California, Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota. Next up was Stacey Abrams, a former state House leader whose defeat in 2018 Georgia governor's race remains disputed by many in the party.Other popular suggestions included Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto of Nevada and Rep. Val Demings of Florida. The Democrats interviewed also proposed seven other women, including Govs. Gretchen Whitmer of Michigan and Michelle Lujan Grisham of New Mexico.While de facto presidential nominees typically keep their list of potential running mates closely held, Biden has helped fuel speculation by eagerly rattling off names for months — nearly all of them women. Even his wife, Jill, offered her take in a private fundraiser earlier this month, praising Klobuchar and criticizing Harris' debate stage attack on her husband last summer.Biden, at various points, has suggested he might choose Abrams, Klobuchar, Sens. Jeanne Shaheen and Maggie Hassan of New Hampshire or Sally Yates, the former assistant attorney general whom President Donald Trump fired three years ago.A female vice president would be historic: Only two women — Rep. Geraldine Ferraro of New York in 1984 and Gov. Sarah Palin of Alaska in 2008 — have been nominated, and none have ever served in the White House. That barrier-breaking appeal could give Biden's candidacy a shot of energy, an acknowledgment of the role women have played in boosting the party during the Trump era.Prominent Democratic activists, officials and leaders have been vocal with their desires that the ticket include a woman, after the demise of the last major female candidate, Warren, who ended her campaign two weeks ago."I've been predicting a woman on the ticket since 2017 and demanding it since Warren dropped out," said Christine Pelosi, a DNC member from San Francisco and the daughter of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. "It's really important to have the ability to lead America in the depression we will enter if we don't flatten the curve and find a cure. The best pick is the woman Joe or Bernie trusts the most to be president and commander-in-chief."Some of the party's most liberal members and supporters of Sanders suggested that choosing Warren, a fellow liberal, would help Biden appeal to the progressive and young voters who have backed the Vermont senator in the primary. Choosing a moderate like Klobuchar, they say, would dampen general election enthusiasm."Whoever ends up the nominee should pick Sen. Warren," said Tefere Gebre, a DNC member from Maryland who is executive vice president of the AFL-CIO. "I would be less enthusiastic if it's the senator from Minnesota."Yet, with the coronavirus upending every part of American society, including the presidential campaign, Biden may be forced to deviate from the standard playbook.Biden's running mate pick will be viewed through the lens of a public health and economic crisis, perhaps raising the stock of candidates who have more experience, or pushing him to consider someone from outside of government."You could imagine some highly successful person from a different walk of life being considered, and that could expand the list a lot," said John Podesta, who as Hillary Clinton's campaign chairman was involved in her vice-presidential search. "A college president or a medical professional, somebody who would send a pretty powerful signal that what you care about is strength, performance, a commitment to facts and sound decision-making."Biden's campaign said it was beginning to build a team to conduct a "vigorous vetting process." Some close to the campaign say the team is in the early stages of compiling a list of potential running mates and then will vet them. Beyond his own experience as Barack Obama's vice president, Biden has a deep bench of aides to consult. One of his closest advisers, Ron Klain, helped do vice-presidential vetting for Al Gore in 2000.Mitt Romney cut his campaign's list of about 80 potential running mates to 20 in early April 2012. By late July, the list had been narrowed to five men, after the one woman under serious consideration, former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, declined the campaign's invitation to be vetted. (Romney eventually chose Rep. Paul Ryan).Donald Trump's 2016 vetting process was less streamlined, but among those he interviewed during his search was Sen. Joni Ernst of Iowa.Clinton started with a list of 40 possible candidates, which was narrowed to nine who underwent a process of serious vetting, an interview and a campaign appearance with the candidate. While she considered a number of women to be vice president, only Warren advanced to the final stages of the process.For Biden, 77, a much younger woman could assuage concerns about his age and critiques about a primary process that started with the most diverse field in history and ended with two white men.Biden's campaign hopes the early announcement that he would select a woman will give his operation a shot of enthusiasm from voters, even as the presidential election heads into a deep freeze because of the coronavirus. On Thursday, his campaign sent a fundraising appeal asking supporters to "commit to standing with" Biden and his future female running mate.By announcing he will pick a woman, Biden is aiming to give his ticket a modern-day balance in a party focused on issues of racial and gender representation. Past nominees have chosen running mates who provided geographic diversity (Lloyd Bentsen in 1988) or offered the promise of winning a key state (Ryan, from Wisconsin, in 2012). Obama, just four years into his Senate term, chose Biden in 2008 to ease concerns about his own relative lack experience and help appeal to white working-class voters.Choosing Harris, 55, would not only provide not a gender balance but also would add a black woman to the ticket after black voters helped revive Biden's campaign in February. But as Jill Biden's recent criticism indicated, the memory of Harris' debate stage attack may hinder her chances."I have to tell you that I'm a little torn in terms of my choices," said Alma Gonzalez, a DNC member from Florida. "If it were me and if I was Joe Biden, I would say to Sen. Harris, 'Do you want to be on the Supreme Court or be my vice president?'"Presidential candidates rarely place public restrictions on their pick, preferring to keep options open so they can pivot their selection to suit the shifting dynamics of the campaign. Veterans of past vice-presidential searches said the most important elements have been how comfortable the nominees are with their would-be partners.And while past campaigns spent months vetting candidates and agonizing over running-mate strategy, there's very little academic research suggesting that the vice-presidential pick has a huge impact on winning the general election."The first and most important criteria is, can this person help you win in November and will they at least not hurt you in November," said Podesta.For Clinton, that meant ruling out candidates from states with Republican governors, like Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio. If she won, her team feared that Brown could be replaced in the Senate by a Republican and shift the balance of the chamber away from her future administration.Unlike any nominee since Gore, Biden has a unique view into the selection process, having gone through it himself. While Obama started with a list of 20 candidates, he faced pressure to select Clinton as his running mate and create a "unity ticket." After Obama rejected that idea, the choice came down to a "coin toss" between Biden and Sen. Evan Bayh of Indiana. Biden was more energetic and enthusiastic in his interview, according to aides.In an interview earlier this month, Biden cited his close relationship with Obama as a model for his selection process, saying the president was able to trust him with key pieces of his agenda."For me, the most important thing in choosing a vice president is whether or not the person is simpatico with me in terms of where I want to take the country," he said. "It's really important that the next president is able to do what Barack was able to do with me."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company



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There's reportedly 'a lot of pressure' on Biden to pick Warren as running mate

There's reportedly 'a lot of pressure' on Biden to pick Warren as running mateOne thing is clear about former Vice President Joe Biden's potential running mate: he's going to pick a woman. But there are several candidates for the job that present intriguing arguments for his campaign advisers, Politico reports.Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) for example is an oft-touted name, as she would appeal to African American voters, who have carried Biden's campaign into the driver's seat. Plus, the two get along well, despite clashing in earlier debates when Harris was still campaigning herself.Another former Democratic presidential contender, Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), could make sense because she could help reel in the sought-after Rust Belt votes that are likely to be so crucial in the November election.But there's also Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.). It's no secret Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) both desperately want Warren's endorsement, but it may be somewhat of a surprise to hear that Biden's team is facing "a lot of pressure" to add her to the ticket, an adviser said. Warren and Biden don't line up too precisely on policy — the former tends to veer more in the progressive lane — but Biden has made some overtures recently, including supporting Warren's bankruptcy reform plan, so it's possible she's under legitimate consideration for the opening. Read more at Politico.More stories from theweek.com The conservatives who would sacrifice the elderly to save the economy A Japanese flu drug appears to be effective at combatting coronavirus, Chinese studies show Trump's tweets show his dramatic 9-day shift toward actually taking coronavirus seriously



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Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Reveals to Seth Meyers What She’ll Do If Biden Beats Bernie

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Reveals to Seth Meyers What She’ll Do If Biden Beats BernieWhen Seth Meyers sat down with Rep. Alexandria-Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) on Thursday night, he expressed the big fear for Democratic voters now that the presidential contest is down to just two candidates. “Everyone’s worried if one wins, will the supporters of the other sort of agree to support the Democratic nominee,” the Late Night host said. “Is it safe to assume that you will support Joe Biden if he is the nominee?” Ocasio-Cortez, who has been one of Bernie Sanders’ most vital surrogates on the campaign trail, did not hedge or hesitate in her answer. “Yeah, you know, I’ve said throughout this entire process that what is so important is that we ultimately unite behind who that Democratic nominee is,” she said. “And I think it’s a two-way street. I’ve been concerned by some folks that say if Bernie’s the nominee, they won’t support him—and the other way around.”“Right now, November, you know, this is more important than all of us,” she continued. “And we really need to make sure that we defeat Donald Trump at the polls—assuming, and knowing, how insane it’s going to get between now and then.” Earlier in the interview, Ocasio-Cortez addressed Sanders’ underwhelming performance on Super Tuesday, especially among the type of younger voters that she has helped energize. Hillary Clinton Gets Tipsy and Throws Shade at Bernie and Trump on ‘Watch What Happens Live’Trevor Noah Isn’t Buying the Biden Surge: ‘This Is Not Good’After noting the increase in youth turnout that helped Sanders in states like Iowa and New Hampshire, she acknowledged that they need to do better. “It is going to be now and in November, I believe, turnout of young people that will have a huge determination in our future as a country,” she said. “And this is an enormous responsibility. And we’ve got to really, really turn up or else—you get what you fight for. And you get what you vote for. And I think it’s so incredibly important that we fight for a future that will work for us.” For more, listen and subscribe to The Last Laugh podcast. Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



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South Carolina primary win puts Biden back in contention — but can he catch Bernie?

South Carolina primary win puts Biden back in contention — but can he catch Bernie?After finishing a disappointing fourth in Iowa, a dismal fifth in New Hampshire and a distant second in Nevada, Joe Biden needed a big win in South Carolina on Saturday to keep his primary campaign alive. The question now is whether it will be enough: enough to resuscitate his formerly frontrunning bid, refill his empty coffers, reverse his stagnant poll numbers and propel him to the kind of comeback performance on Super Tuesday that could slow Bernie Sanders’s momentum — and perhaps leave Biden as the last Democrat standing between Sanders and the nomination. “Let me talk directly to Democrats across America, especially those who will be voting on Super Tuesday: This is the moment to choose the path forward for our party,”  Biden said in his victory speech at the University of South Carolina.



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