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Prominent Bernie Sanders supporters are calling on Joe Biden to drop out of the 2020 race over Tara Reade's sexual assault allegation

Prominent Bernie Sanders supporters are calling on Joe Biden to drop out of the 2020 race over Tara Reade's sexual assault allegation"Out of respect for survivors and for the good of the country, he should withdraw from the race," Sanders' 2020 national organizing director tweeted.

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Bernie drops out, as Democrats pick pragmatism over consistency

Bernie drops out, as Democrats pick pragmatism over consistencyIn many ways, Bernie Sanders is the anti-Trump. And, in important ways, he ran his campaign as the anti-Biden.Sanders bowed out of the Democratic nomination race on April 8, repeating his runner-up status from four years earlier. His two runs at the White House have cemented his legacy as a consistent standard-bearer for progressive policies. The veteran democratic socialist possessed a rare quality for a political candidate in this age of Trumpian fickleness. He is a politician whose actions and beliefs have remained steadfast over time and across campaigns. But in the current political moment, it appears the Democratic electorate longs less for a politician who is consistent from day to day than one who can provide pragmatic leadership to unseat the vacillating Trump. Same ol’ SandersSanders ran his campaign as the antithesis of a political showman, who says one thing today and another tomorrow with little regard for facts and consistency. He has exhibited throughout his career what anthropologist Alessandro Duranti calls “existential coherence” – he is a political figure “whose past, present, and future actions, beliefs, and evaluations follow some clear basic principles, none of which contradicts another.” As a linguistic anthropologist who studies language and politics, I know that traditionally, candidates have worried about how to project a consistent political persona, and they have often gone to great pains to do so. But Trump shattered that expectation, excelling in self-contradictions and inconsistencies – often within a single sitting.Sanders, instead, has put forth a consistent vision that has remained more or less the same since his early days in politics as mayor of Burlington, Vermont. Rather than moving toward the electorate and shifting positions based on perceptions of what the electorate desired, the electorate has moved toward Sanders to join his vision for universal health care and other progressive causes. A CNBC survey in 2019 found that a majority of Americans supported progressive policies, including a higher minimum wage and Medicare for All – key issues that Sanders has been advocating throughout his decades-long political career. In an episode of Comedy Central’s “The Daily Show” last year, host Trevor Noah unearthed footage from 1987 of Sanders discussing politics on a local public access channel in his hometown of Burlington. The Bernie Sanders of 1987 talked of the unfair tax system that placed a large burden on working people and the need for universal health care. “We are one of two nations in the industrialized world that does not have a national health care system,” declared Sanders in 1987. Three decades later, in both his 2016 and 2020 presidential campaigns, Sanders continued with that theme. In 2016, he released his Medicare for All plan by declaring, “It is time for our country to join every other major industrialized nation on Earth and guarantee health care to all citizens as a right, not a privilege.” His 2020 campaign website further echoed this sentiment, stating that “the United States will join every other major country on Earth and guarantee health care to all people as a right.” A consistent candidate often comes across as a more authentic candidate – someone who is staying true to his core self rather than pandering to the latest polling data or saying whatever will attract the most dramatic news coverage. Sanders’ authenticity as a candidate who has fought for working people and progressive ideals his entire life made him appealing to many liberals. He attracted an unshakable following of core supporters because of it. ‘Results, not revolution’Biden’s pragmatic approach, however, trumped Sanders’ often dogmatic consistency. In their debates, Sanders hammered Biden over what he saw as shifting stances on Social Security, Medicare and veterans’ programs. And then there was Biden’s 2003 vote for the Iraq war before he turned against it.But this is not the 2004 presidential election, where accusations of flip-flopping can sink a candidate, like it did John Kerry in his race against George W. Bush. Perhaps Donald Trump’s fickleness has changed what voters look for in a candidate. Maybe it’s simply that nobody cares about Biden’s apparent lack of judgment in 2003, which occurred well before he spent eight years as vice president in arguably one of the most popular Democratic administrations in U.S. history.Biden easily parried Sanders’ accusations of inconsistency by pointing to an underlying consistency of principles that have guided his varying positions over time. Voters ultimately decided to support someone who exhibits a practical sense of how to govern in a way that gets things done. As Biden said in his last debate with Sanders, “People are looking for results, not revolution.”On health care, one might have expected Sanders to have an advantage with his Medicare for All proposal, a consistent theme across his time as mayor, congressman, senator and presidential candidate. Polling done by the Kaiser Family Foundation found that for the first time a majority of Americans began to support a single government plan for health care in 2016, corresponding to the Sanders campaign push for Medicare for All.But in the same Kaiser poll, more Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents said they would prefer a candidate who would build on the Affordable Care Act rather than replace it. Biden’s campaign argued precisely for this more pragmatic approach, and he positioned himself as the right person to get the job done in a contentious political environment. An overtureAfter sweeping the primaries in Florida, Illinois and Arizona in March – putting the wheels in motion for the eventual withdrawal of Sanders from the race – Biden then struck the right chord in his speech after the Florida primary by making an appeal to Sanders voters. “I hear you,” he said. “I know what’s at stake. I know what we have to do. Our goal as a campaign and my goal as a candidate for president is to unify this party and then to unify the nation.” Biden’s appeal to Sanders voters suggests he may be willing to absorb some of the best ideas from Sanders – and other candidates. It’s a pragmatic approach, rather than a dogmatic consistency, that may bring along their supporters, too. That may be exactly what he will need to do to beat Trump in November.[You’re smart and curious about the world. So are The Conversation’s authors and editors. You can read us daily by subscribing to The Conversation’s newsletter.]This article is republished from The Conversation, a nonprofit news site dedicated to sharing ideas from academic experts.Read more: * Biden’s big night with moderates, African Americans and baby boomers * Biden’s resurrection was unprecedented – and well-timedAdam Hodges does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

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Bernie Sanders asks Elizabeth Warren and her supporters for backing

Bernie Sanders asks Elizabeth Warren and her supporters for backingAttempt to reverse Joe Biden’s surging momentum two days before crucial votes in six states * Kamala Harris endorses Joe BidenBernie Sanders made a pitch for the backing of Senator Elizabeth Warren and her supporters on Sunday in an attempt to reverse his rival Joe Biden’s surging momentum towards the Democratic party’s presidential nomination.In a series of appearances on political talk shows two days before crucial primary votes in Michigan, Missouri and four other key states, Sanders highlighted the alignment of his progressive policies on a range of issues to those of the liberal Massachusetts senator, who dropped out of the race on Thursday and who has yet to announce an endorsement.His move came on the same day as another former rival, the California senator Kamala Harris, announced that she was backing Biden to win the nomination and beat Donald Trump in November, adding to other candidates who have dropped from the race and swung their support to the former vice-president, including Amy Klobuchar, Pete Buttigieg and Mike Bloomberg.“We would love to have Senator Warren’s support, we would love to have the millions of people who supported Senator Warren,” Sanders said on CNN’s State of the Union.“Senator Warren talked about a wealth tax, something I think is enormously important. We also have a wealth tax, nuanced different from hers but the same principle at a time of massive income and wealth inequality.“We’ve reached out, we’re looking and asking for the support of Senator Warren’s supporters, and hope they come on board.”The Vermont senator, 78, also picked up one notable endorsement on Sunday, that of Jesse Jackson, the veteran civil rights leader who won the Michigan caucuses in his unsuccessful 1988 run at the Democratic presidential nomination.“A people far behind cannot catch up choosing the most moderate path,” Jackson said in a statement. “The most progressive social and economic path gives us the best chance to catch up and Bernie Sanders represents the most progressive path.”Sanders, who raced to an early lead in the Democratic nomination process with successes in Nevada and New Hampshire, but fell behind last week in Biden’s extraordinary Super Tuesday comeback, cannot afford to lose more ground this Tuesday when primary voters in the delegate-rich midwestern states of Michigan and Missouri, plus Idaho, Mississippi, North Dakota and Washington go to the polls.On NBC’s Meet the Press on Sunday, Sanders addressed concerns expressed by Warren two days ago over “online bullying and organized nastiness” by his supporters, but did not directly answer if he thought Warren was holding back her support because of it.“I am concerned about the kind of ugliness that exists on the internet and the Twitter world in general, it is very ugly,” he said.“And I will not deny for a second that we have some people who claim to be supporters, although I have a hard time understanding why they think they can support me and make vicious personal attacks against people. That’s not what our campaign is about.”Asked by host Chuck Todd if he thought he could win the nomination without Warren’s support, Sanders replied: “Of course we can. We can win this because we are going to win the support of working people all over this country.”Sanders had two rallies planned on Sunday in Michigan, the rust belt state he won narrowly from Hillary Clinton in a 2016 Democratic primary upset, but in which he trails Biden by almost nine points in FiveThirtyEight’s latest polling.With an eye to securing the support of working class voters, Sanders attacked Biden’s policies and voting record on trade. “In Michigan the people here have been devastated, in Flint, in Detroit, by these disastrous trade agreements that Joe Biden voted for,” he said on CNN, referring to the North Atlantic free trade agreement and deals with China, which he said cost millions of American jobs.He also criticized Biden for supporting the Wall Street bailout, and said the vice-president had overplayed his role in the Obama-era $ 80bn rescue package for the struggling American auto industry that kept production plants open in Michigan and elsewhere.“Well the auto bailout was done by the Obama administration and it was a step forward, but I sometimes think Joe is taking credit as vice-president for initiatives that were led by President Obama and by many members of Congress,” he said.“If Joe is the candidate believe me Trump will and has already talked about Joe’s record on trade. We have a voting record that speaks to the needs of working families. If you’re going into the industrial base of the United States of America, the heartland of America, and you voted for agreements that have devastated communities like Flint and Detroit it’s hard to make [a] case when Trump has made trade such an important part of his agenda.”Sanders did, however, pledge his support to Biden if he won the nomination. “We’ve got to do everything possible to defeat Trump. I’ll support Joe if he wins, he’ll support me if I win,” he said.Biden, 77, was planning to appear at rallies in Grand Rapids and Detroit on Monday to help secure the majority of the Michigan’s 125 delegates to the Democratic national convention in July that will determine the nominee. Nationally, he leads Sanders 664-573 in delegates pledged so far, with 1,991 needed to win outright.The two will go head to head on 15 March in Arizona in their first televised debate since Warren’s withdrawal made it a two-person race.



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Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Reveals to Seth Meyers What She’ll Do If Biden Beats Bernie

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Reveals to Seth Meyers What She’ll Do If Biden Beats BernieWhen Seth Meyers sat down with Rep. Alexandria-Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) on Thursday night, he expressed the big fear for Democratic voters now that the presidential contest is down to just two candidates. “Everyone’s worried if one wins, will the supporters of the other sort of agree to support the Democratic nominee,” the Late Night host said. “Is it safe to assume that you will support Joe Biden if he is the nominee?” Ocasio-Cortez, who has been one of Bernie Sanders’ most vital surrogates on the campaign trail, did not hedge or hesitate in her answer. “Yeah, you know, I’ve said throughout this entire process that what is so important is that we ultimately unite behind who that Democratic nominee is,” she said. “And I think it’s a two-way street. I’ve been concerned by some folks that say if Bernie’s the nominee, they won’t support him—and the other way around.”“Right now, November, you know, this is more important than all of us,” she continued. “And we really need to make sure that we defeat Donald Trump at the polls—assuming, and knowing, how insane it’s going to get between now and then.” Earlier in the interview, Ocasio-Cortez addressed Sanders’ underwhelming performance on Super Tuesday, especially among the type of younger voters that she has helped energize. Hillary Clinton Gets Tipsy and Throws Shade at Bernie and Trump on ‘Watch What Happens Live’Trevor Noah Isn’t Buying the Biden Surge: ‘This Is Not Good’After noting the increase in youth turnout that helped Sanders in states like Iowa and New Hampshire, she acknowledged that they need to do better. “It is going to be now and in November, I believe, turnout of young people that will have a huge determination in our future as a country,” she said. “And this is an enormous responsibility. And we’ve got to really, really turn up or else—you get what you fight for. And you get what you vote for. And I think it’s so incredibly important that we fight for a future that will work for us.” For more, listen and subscribe to The Last Laugh podcast. Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



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South Carolina primary win puts Biden back in contention — but can he catch Bernie?

South Carolina primary win puts Biden back in contention — but can he catch Bernie?After finishing a disappointing fourth in Iowa, a dismal fifth in New Hampshire and a distant second in Nevada, Joe Biden needed a big win in South Carolina on Saturday to keep his primary campaign alive. The question now is whether it will be enough: enough to resuscitate his formerly frontrunning bid, refill his empty coffers, reverse his stagnant poll numbers and propel him to the kind of comeback performance on Super Tuesday that could slow Bernie Sanders’s momentum — and perhaps leave Biden as the last Democrat standing between Sanders and the nomination. “Let me talk directly to Democrats across America, especially those who will be voting on Super Tuesday: This is the moment to choose the path forward for our party,”  Biden said in his victory speech at the University of South Carolina.



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Bloomberg once said Social Security is a bigger Ponzi scheme than Bernie Madoff's

Bloomberg once said Social Security is a bigger Ponzi scheme than Bernie Madoff'sBillionaire and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg twice compared Social Security to a Ponzi scheme when he was in office, CNN reports, which is a far cry from his current stance as a Democratic presidential candidate.Nowadays, Bloomberg has vowed to to strengthen entitlement programs, but he used to see them as a major hurdle in the effort to shrink the United States' deficit. During appearances on his old radio program "Live from City Hall," which were reviewed by CNN's KFile, Bloomberg made the Ponzi scheme comparison once in 2006 and again in 2009. The latter instance was in relation to Bernie Madoff, who was arrested in December 2008 and later pleaded guilty to a massive Ponzi scheme."I don't know if Bernie Madoff got his idea from there, but if there's ever a Ponzi Scheme, people say Madoff was the biggest? Wrong," Bloomberg said. "Social Security is, far and away."Stu Loeser, a spokesman for Bloomberg, attempted to explain Bloomberg's comments to CNN. "The Social Security Administration itself gives out detailed actuarial tables on when and how payments will exceed income, and the issue needs attention because we're running the cushion between them down," he said. "Mike believes that between now and that time, we will need to boost receipts by raising contributions from those who can best afford it, which is what he'll do as president." Read more at CNN.More stories from theweek.com Harvard scientist predicts coronavirus will infect up to 70 percent of humanity Stephen Colbert teaches Elizabeth Warren about South Carolina cuisine, tells a dirty joke, gets jabbed by a fork Israel is the first country to warn its citizens not to travel abroad over coronavirus fears



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